That feeling when you want to write a review of the smart band, but you realise you can’t find it. The reason is, it was so feeble you declined to keep wearing it just after a couple of days. And although I was trying to force myself to change my mind, I wasn’t able to do that. A couple of times. This is Samsung Galaxy Fit e.

I’m really sorry for this spoiler. I wasn’t able to start this review any better. This Galaxy Fit e smart band from Samsung is so repulsive it was nearly causing me pain while I was wearing it. It does NOT look good, it’s NOT ergonomic, and its features are really limited. So I gave up, and I’m going to return it and get a refund. Frankly speaking, they should pay me extra for emotional suffering caused by wearing it. Could it be even worse?

A quick look – Samsung Galaxy Fit e hardware


Samsung Galaxy Fit e is a smart band that covers some more features beside showing actual time, steps and burnt calories. It also shows your heart rate, your sleep pattern and calendar entries. Some basic stuff. Not too bad, isn’t it? However, it makes it imperfectly.

Samsung Galaxy Fit e

The basics, battery life. The battery in this smart band is tiny (70 mAh) and it lasts for only one and a half days. Forget about declared ‘typical usage time 6-7 days’. It’s impossible to achieve, at least as long as Samsung means ‘typical usage’ by wearing it while turned off. That means the battery life in this smart band is closer to full-sized smartwatches full of features and (don’t forget!) colour screen with much higher resolution. In other words, it’s a headache to charge this Fit e smart band every other day.

All right. So if the battery life is not too long then the screen of this smart band must be at least somewhat good. Eventually, we got used to the fact that the better screen is, the shortest time on the battery the device works, right? Well, not much. The numbers and parameters of the screen don’t really matter at all here (if they do, however, it’s 0.74 in and 128×64 pixels). What matter here much more, for sure, is that Galaxy Fit e has a monochromatic display that can burn the eyes. You don’t need to have 20/20 vision to see single pixels on it. As a result of it, the content on the screen is pretty sharp, and it’s literally not pleasant to look at it. Welcome back to 2016.

But that’s not the whole story. Chances are you also got used to the smooth screens you can use or just gently touch with your fingertip. And you would like to have it in your smart band too. But not here. Samsung wants you to change your habit by forcing you to tap on the screen of Fit e firmly. Is it doable? Of course, it is. Is it pleasant? Not at all. The screen of this smart band is so small you should be able to touch it gently to make it work. But it looks like Samsung thinks the opposite.

Samsung Galaxy Fit e

I also wasn’t able to get used to a slightly thin strap and its fastening. It’s somewhat troublesome and not too comfortable to do and believe me, you’ll be forced to do that pretty soon, as there’s no option to charge it without taking it off your wrist.

Vibration. This is one of just a few things I couldn’t complain about (although it could be a bit stronger and slightly stiller. However, it’s not too bad, after all). Still, it’s strong enough to wake you up in the morning. And silent enough to not to wake up your partner at the same time. That’s nice.

That’s a quick look at the hardware you’ll find in Samsung Galaxy Fit e. Let’s have a glimpse at some software aspects of this smart band from South Korea.