It’s not going to be the best Birthday Cake ever. Although it’s pretty nice and tasty, it contains an addition that has the capacity for inducing allergic reactions in individuals with pre-existing moderate asthma. How unhappy it sounds?


With all these healthier and quality ingredients available, some makers decide to use these lower quality ones. Their choice. Some of them go even further using these of doubtful health impact. And I don’t mean palm oil or syrups. Rather these less popular, like Brilliant Blue FCF (or Blue 1) colourant. And this is what PhD made in their latest Smart Cake Birthday Cake protein cookie. It doesn’t sound like anything happy (birthday). But let’s get to the point.

PhD Smart Cake Birthday Cake Protein Cookie
PhD Smart Cake Birthday Cake Protein Cookie

I really liked the smell of this protein cookie. It resembles Birthday Cake with raspberry jam layers. It’s pretty nice, but it could be a bit more intense. Still, it’s inviting. On a part with the texture of this cookie. It’s really soft both on the outside and inside, so no problem with biting into it. Also, jam filling is soft and pleasant, but the cookie itself is middling chewy and somewhat sticky. Still, no issues here at all, as it’s also decently moist.

The party is over. This Birthday Cake is bitterish.


This PhD Smart Cake tastes really good. It tastes like a decently sweet birthday cake, but its flavour is slightly bland, not too sharp or deep. Still, it’s pretty pleasant. However, there’s also a bitterish aroma in the aftertaste. And it’s nothing I expected here. It’s not too disturbing, but ut’s there. Overall, this Smart Cake will make its way as a sweet protein cookie and for some, it might be satisfying. Not for me, though, due to that noticeable bitterness.

Would I want to eat another Smart Cake of this flavour in one sitting? Not much. It was OK, but not too exciting.

PhD Smart Cake Birthday Cake Protein Cookie

Looking from the macros thing, it’s not impressive. At 60g (mine was 65g actually), it packs 225kcal, which is still OK for a cookie. However, there only is 15g (25%) protein. And only 1.2g sugar. Could be better. The ingredients list contains added sugar and Brilliant Blue FCF (or Blue 1) colourant. What’s that?

In short: Brilliant Blue FCF is a blue colourant used in processed food, medications, dietary supplements and cosmetics. [1] What’s the most important here is it has the capacity for inducing allergic reactions in individuals with pre-existing moderate asthma. More than that, it’s allowed to use in the EU (and the US) of 150-300mg/kg bodyweight depending on the food. Also, acceptable daily intake (ADI) for Brilliant Blue FCF is 6 mg/kg bodyweight. [2] So what’s the problem? PhD doesn’t say how much of Brilliant Blue FCF was used in this protein cookie. No comment.

A Russian roulette.


PhD Smart Cake Birthday Cake Protein Cookie

Dear PhD, that’s the wrong way. You not only use a doubtful ingredient in your PhD Smart Cake Birthday Cake Protein Cookie, but you also don’t say how much of that you have used in it. It’s NOT okay. And although this protein cookie scored 5.8/10 pts. which means it’s ‘fair’, I wouldn’t call your behaviour fair. Shame on you, PhD.

Will I ever go back to this PhD protein cookie? There are no chances for that. Say thank you to Blue 1 colourant in it.

5.8
Score

Pros

  • It tastes pretty good (but there's a touch of bitterness in it too)
  • It has a pretty nice and soft texture

Cons

  • It contains Brilliant Blue 1 colourant of unknown amount
  • It contains palm oil
Smell
7
Texture
9
Taste
6.5
Macros
6
Ingredients
2
Overall experience
6

Final Verdict

Dear PhD, that's the wrong way. You not only use a doubtful ingredient in your PhD Smart Cake Birthday Cake Protein Cookie, but you also don't say how much of that you have used in it. It's NOT okay. And although this protein cookie scored 5.8/10 pts. which means it's 'fair', I wouldn't call your behaviour fair. Shame on you, PhD.